210 Maple Restoration


Welcome!

We are very excited to introduce to you to a multi-year project to restore our historic headquarters, affectionately known by League members as 210 Maple. Please come back soon to hear more about our plans for this project! Reach out to us any time if you wish to contribute to the planning and success of this project, can recommend grant-based organizations, contractors, and others who can support our project, or wish to be involved in any way.

If you wish to make a tax-deductible donation benefitting JLSD and its programs, including our efforts to restore our headquarters, please consider giving to the JLSD Annual Fund here.

In the meantime, we invite you to learn more about our historic home and its vibrant history.

In community spirit,

Joni Flaherty & Emily Green
210 Maple Street Restoration Ad Hoc Co-Chairs

flahertyjb@gmail.com

green.emily.a@gmail.com

Ad Hoc Committee Members
Heather Albin
Crystal Arnote
Christiane Hoffman
Leah Jaeger
Rachael Marini
Lisa Meyer
Andrea Myers
Ilo Neukam
Rebecca Sappenfield

The Wegeforth House - Historic Landmark No. 156

 

The "JLSD House" is a site of history.

In 1916, Ralph Granger, a San Diego pioneer, commissioned Louis Gill of the Gill and Gill agency as the architect for a house he later gave to his daughter and son-in-law, Rachel and Dr. Harry Wegeforth. The house is considered to be in the Irving Gill style, and it is believed that Louis and his uncle, living, worked together on the design of this house.

Lester and Milton Wegeforth, sons of Dr. Harry Wegeforth, recalls that the house was "ahead of its time." It featured functioning solar panels, a full in-house vacuum, trap doors for plumbing repairs, plus other special features for its day. The cost of the structure including the lot was $1,600 in 1916. In 1940, Rachel Wegeforth sold the house to Rose Adele Palmer, from whose estate the Junior League of San Diego (JLSD) purchased the house in 1982. The restoration and rehabilitation of the house for JLSD was performed by the firm, Macy, Henderson and Cole, AIA.

Dr. Harry Wegeforth, founder of the San Diego Zoological Society.

Originally from Baltimore, Dr. Harry Wegeforth attended the University of Maryland and did his postgraduate work at the Baltimore Medical College. In 1910, he moved to San Diego and opened his medical office. In 2016, he and his brother Paul were named surgeons for the Panama-California International Exposition in Balboa Park. It was also in 1916 that the Dr. attended the first official meeting of the San Diego Zoological Society, and served as its Founder and President until 1944. Not only did he originate the idea of a zoo for San Diego, he also carried through with its development, enlisting tremendous support for its exhibits. Today, the San Diego Zoological Society enjoys an unparalleled reputation for the care and study of animals and is a world renown educational organization.

Louis Gill, a renowned San Diego architect.

Louis Gill attended the School of Architecture at Syracuse University, awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts in 1938. He was noted as an asset to his profession, constantly working toward improving architectural standards. For many years he was a member of the State Bar of Architectural Examiners and assisted in the start of an AlA chapter in San Diego. Other building designs to Louis Gill's credit include: the Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, the San Diego Zoo Hospital and Research Lab, exhibit structures for the San Diego Zoo, the St. James-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, dormitory for The Bishop's Schools, the Mission Hills Congregational Church, clinical structure for Sharp HealthCare Rees-Stealy, and the John Mitchell house and art gallery in Coronado which won the AIA award for best design in 1942 (since demolished).

Adele Rose Palmer, an San Diego pioneer.

The Palmers were an influential San Diego pioneer family. In 1940, Adele Rose Palmer purchased the house and immaculately furnished it with an assemble of antiques and collectibles. There were rare American, French, Chinese, and Japanese furnishings including a signed Tiffany lamp; all of which were auctioned in 1981 with the proceeds going to various charities.

Junior League of San Diego.

In 1981, JLSD began a county-wide search for its next headquarters, and landed upon the home located at 210 Maple Street. With the help of its members and their generous contributions, along with a $100,000 gift from the Sefton Foundation, JLSD purchased the home for $325,000. The sale closed on January 29, 1981. JLSD then went to work restoring the home, which had fallen into disrepair, and also obtained historical designation through the San Diego Historical Resources Board. Our Junior League sustaining members who were active in the purchase and restoration of 210 Maple continue to hold a great sense of pride and accomplishment for the project, as they secured a valuable asset for the League and a meeting space for JLSD members for decades to come.

In 2000, JLSD initiated a second project to improve 210 Maple, as part of the home being featured as San Diego Home & Garden magazine's "showcase home." During that time, several rooms of the home were decorated for the magazine feature, each by a different designer. While many of the furnishings used for the feature were on loan, the project's efforts can still be seen today through the window treatments, wall frescoes, and other details that remain unchanged.

The 210 Maple legacy.

For nearly 90 years, JLSD has continued the support of charities, filling community needs that change and multiply as San Diego grows, in keeping with the strong sense of philanthropy of the Wegeforths and Palmers. Through fundraising activities, administrative and training skills, and volunteer efforts, JLSD continues to be a major force in establishing many of San Diego County's volunteer agencies and civic leaders.

210 Maple Under Construction - c. 1915

Construction Nearly Completed - c. 1916

Exterior of 210 Maple soon after JLSD purchased the house - c. 1982. Notice the addition of St. Paul Manor Tower to the rear of the home on 2nd Avenue. The Manor Tower, which is home to a health and family services center and retirement residences, was erected in 1966.

The condition of the kitchen soon after JLSD purchased the house. Notice that the original oven and refrigeration coolers still exist today.

JLSD's Board of Directors and Restoration Ad Hoc Committee hope that the kitchen will be the first step in the house restoration project, and are looking for grants and other gifts to restore the kitchen to its former glory, while offering a functional space for JLSD members and our partners.

JLSD members hard at work cleaning and updating its new headquarters - c. 1982

The Junior League of San Diego is a 501(c)(3) public benefit corporation. Please consult your tax advisor regarding the taxable benefits of contributing to JLSD.